Yahoo Weather

You are here

From the Archives 070314

130 YEARS AGO

A ripple of excitement was caused last Friday by the rumor that a new-made grave had been discovered over on the island north of town. An investigation revealed nothing except a log and some underbrush which had probably had some dirt washed over them by rain.

120 YEARS AGO

Something in the weather Sunday evening caused the varnish on the seats of the Presbyterian Church to stick, and when the large audience that assembled to hear the Children’s Day exercises attempted to rise, almost everyone had the feeling that he was going to leave a large part of his wardrobe behind.

One day last week while Mrs. Hubble Pattee was out in the yard at her home southwest of town a large rifle ball passed through the crown of the straw hat she had on, just singing her hair. She heard no report and where it came from is a mystery. It was a close call, and probably a stray bullet from some hunter.

100 YEARS AGO

P.D. McGoey, the chief of the Perry police force, trapped himself one day last week. Perry has a place it calls a jail, as well as a chief of police. McGoey thought the jail ought to be put in a more attractive shape for an anticipated rush of business for the Fourth and undertook to clean it up. He forgot the outer door had a spring lock and when he had finished his job of cleaning up, he found himself a prisoner. A good use of his lungs finally attracted attention and he was released.

70 YEARS AGO

From “Around the town” by Scott Snyder: “Dr. R.C. Frush came home from Gull Lake Sunday–hottest day in many years. Then he sat down a wrote a note to his wife, saying: ‘If hell is any hotter than Adel I’m cancelling my reservation.’ So reports our Gull Lake correspondent.”

35 YEARS AGO

From “By George” by George DeFord: “What a kid thinks about his father: Four years old, ‘My daddy can do anything.’ At seven, ‘My dad knows a whole lot.’ At eight years, ‘Dad doesn’t know quite everything.’ When he reaches 12 he thinks, ‘Oh well, Dad just doesn’t understand.’ At age 14, ‘Father? He’s hopelessly old-fashioned.’ At 21, ‘That man is so far out of date, what can you expect?’ At 25 years, ‘He comes up with a good idea now and then.’ At 30 years old, ‘Must find out what Dad thinks of this.’ He thinks at age 35, ‘A little patience, let’s get Dad’s opinion on this matter first.’ At 50 years, ‘What would Dad have thought about this?’ By age 60 he thinks, ‘Wish I could talk to Dad about this matter just like we used to.’”

Close
The Dallas County News website is available only to print and digital subscribers. If you are already a subscriber, you can access the website at no additional charge.