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Supes unanimously vote on $16.850 million bond issue for Aug. 6 election

The new facility could look like this drawing from Design Alliance, Inc. with pitched roofs, partial brick exterior and glass for natural sunlight.
The new facility could look like this drawing from Design Alliance, Inc. with pitched roofs, partial brick exterior and glass for natural sunlight.

The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved to present a $16,850,000 bond referendum to Dallas County voters on Aug. 6 for a new county and jail administration facility.

Ongoing talks between the Supervisors and Jerry Purdy with Design Alliance, Inc., a Waukee-based design firm heading the project, estimated the project cost at $22 million with a $16.5 million bond referendum for a county administration, jail and jail administration and re-purposing current county offices at 902 Court, 907 Court, 810 Court and 201 Nile Kinnick.

Even though the county plans on using around $5.5 million out of their capital improvement fund, Eric Boehlert with Ahlers and Cooney, PC stated there will be additional costs including bonding costs, costs for a financial advisor and contractor fees which could amount up to $320-$330,000.

Although there will be some additional costs, both Chair Mark Hanson and Supervisor Kim Chapman agreed they would like to keep the bond issue under $17 million.

“I’m comfortable at a bond issue of $16.850 million,” Chapman said. “We don’t need to ask for $17 million if it’s not needed.”

Hanson agreed and said, “For me, this is not a political decision, but what is the right number for our citizens. Are the citizens going to support us on this project? I hope they will.”

The 91,150 square-foot facility will hold the Treasurer, Recorder, Assessor, Veterans Affairs, Board of Supervisors, Human Resources, Auditor, Operations Administration, IT and Sheriff/jail administration staff. Other services like Planning and Development, Environmental Health and Human Services will remain in Adel’s historic downtown area.

Facilities Manager Bobby Hughes updated the board on the Adel courthouse downspout drains and found that there are three cracks. The most noticeable crack is on the third floor on the north-west side, which could eventually cause leaking.

A bid of $8,000 was mentioned to fix the issue, but Hughes said he is waiting on a second bid.

The last time the courthouse was scoped was in 2007 during the remodeling project; however, Hughes said at that time there were no cracks in the building.

“I’ve reviewed and reviewed the tape and they aren’t visible at that point,” he said. “You also realize that during the construction, the building moved and shifted. Man-made interruptions don’t help the process.”

Delayed court scheduling was one concern of the Supervisors, but Hughes said construction crews would most likely do the work at night or on a weekend.

The board agreed to move forward with addressing the leaks and wait for a second bid.

Other business:

Approved Solutions Hardware and Software renewal agreements;

Set time and date for a public hearing on a law enforcement service 28E agreement with Redfield and Dexter for June 25 at 10 a.m.;

Renewed an inmate healthcare annual contract for $59,173.08 at a 3.5 percent increase;

Discussed weight limit postings for 1311550 Meadow Dr. at Walnut Creek from a legal limit to a 20-30-30 ton, 131650 Sportsman Rd. at Local Creek from a five-ton to a three-ton weight limit, 131720 Indian Ave. at Panther Creek from a 21-31-31 limit to the legal limit and 131750 270th St. at Panther Creek from a 25-35-40 limit to a legal, one-lane limit. The postings would remain in effect until the structure is replaced or rehabilitated, and;

Heard from Suren Gupta, treasurer of the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center of Iowa, on a request to pave 155th lane which leads to the temple in Madrid. Gupta stated he is willing to pay for half of the cost at $30,000; however, the board expressed that the paving cost was not budgeted for the 2013-14 fiscal year.

“I don’t see myself supporting this at this time because there are so many people who are waiting for their own gravel roads to get paved,” Hanson said. “When I look at local county taxpayers, I can’t see them supporting this, but if there are other alternatives or something the State DOT or City of Madrid can do we will look into that.”

Currently, Dallas County consists of 700 miles of gravel roads and only 170 miles of paved roads.

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